Concepts of social support: positive and negative effects of social relations in the context of subjective well-being of a human being :: IKBFU's united scientific journal editorial office

×

Login
Password
Forgot your password?
Login As
You can log in if you are registered at one of these services:
   
The supreme embodiment of reason is science
Ivan P. Pavlov

DOI-generator Search by DOI on Crossref.org

Concepts of social support: positive and negative effects of social relations in the context of subjective well-being of a human being

Author Lifintsev D., Lifintseva A. .
Pages 74-80
Article Download
Keywords social support, social network, phases of social support.
Abstract (summary) This article describes the basic negative and positive effects of social relations of a person in the context of their subjective well-being on the basis of international publications, which have not been translated into Russian yet and are little known in the country. The authors present their own typology of positive and negative effects of social support in situations of normal and abnormal social functioning of an individual.
References

1.     Berkman L., Glass T., Brissette I., Seeman T. From social integration to health: Durkheim in the new millennium // Social Science and Medicine. 2000. Vol. 51. P. 843—858.

2.     Bolger N., Zuckerman A., Kessler R. C. Invisible support and adjustment to stress // Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2000. Vol. 79. № 6. P. 953—961.

3.     Brashers D. E., Neidig J. L., Goldsmith D. J. Social support and the management of uncertainty for people living with HIV or AIDS // Health Communication. 2004. Vol. 16. P. 305—331.

4.     Burleson B. R., MacGeorge E. L. Supportive communication // Handbook of in­terpersonal communication / eds. M. L. Knapp, J. A. Daly; 3rd ed. Thousand Oaks (CA), 2002. P. 374—424.

5.     Cassel J. The contribution of the social environment to host resistance // Am. Journal Epidemiol. 1976. Vol. 104. P. 107—123.

6.     Chesler M., Barbarin O. Difficulties of providing help in a crisis: Relations be­tween parents of children with cancer and their friends // Journal of Social Issues. 1984. Vol. 40 (4). P. 113—134.

7.     Cobb S. Social support as a moderator of life stress // Psychosom. Med. 1976. Vol. 38. P. 300—314.

8.     Cohen S., Syme S. L. Issues in the study and application of social support // So­cial support and health / eds. S. Cohen, S. L. Syme. Orlando, 1985. Р. 3—22.

9.     Cohen S., Wills T. A. Stress, social support, and buffering hypothesis // Psy­chol. Bull. 1985. Vol. 98. P. 310—357.

10.  Collins N. L., Dunkel-Schetter C., Lobel M. et al. Social Support in pregnancy: Psy­chosocial correlates of birth outcomes and postpartum depression // Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1993. Vol. 65 (6). P. 1243—1258.

11.  Davis M. C., Swan P. D. Association of negative and positive social ties with fi­brinogen levels in young women // Health Psychology. 1999. Vol. 18. P. 131—139.

12.  Goldsmith D. J. Communicating social support. Cambridge (UK), 2004.

13.  Holahan C., Moos R., Holahan C. et al. Social support, coping, and depressive symptoms in a latemiddle-aged sample of patients reporting cardiac illness // Health Psychol. 1995. Vol. 14 (2). Р. 152—163.

14.  House J. S., Landis K. R., Umberson D. Social relationships and health // Scien­ce. 1988. Vol. 241. P. 540—545.

15.  King K. B., Reis H. T., Porter L. A. et al. Social support and long-term recovery form coronary artery surgery: Effects on patients and spouses // Health Psychology. 1993. Vol. 12 (1). P. 56—63.

16.  Laireiter A. R., Baumann U., Perkonigg A. et al. Himmelbauer S. Social support re­sources in interpersonal relationships (social networks) during stressful life condi­tions: Results from two pilot studies // European review of applied psychology-re­vue Europeenne de psychologie appliquee. 1997. Vol. 47 (2). P. 123—129.

17.  Lewis M. A., Rook K. S. Social control in personal relationships: Impact on health behaviors and psychological distress // Health Psychology. 1999. Vol. 18. P. 63—71.

18.  Miller K. I., Ray E. B. Beyond the ties that bind: Exploring the “meaning” of sup­portive messages and relationships // Burleson B. R., Albrecht T. L., Sarason I. G. Communication of social support: Messages, interactions, relationships, and com­munity. Thousand Oaks (CA), 1994. P. 215—228.

19.  Reis H. T., Franks P. The role of intimacy and social support in health outco­mes: Two processes or one? // Personal Relationships. 1994.Vol. 1. P. 185—197.

20.  Rook K. S., Pietromonaco P. Close relationships: Times that heal or ties that bind? // Advances in personal relationships / eds. W. H. Jones, D. Perlman. Vol. 1. Greenwich (CT), 1987. P. 1—35.

21.  Rook K. S. The negative side of social interactions: Impact on psychological wellbeing // Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1984. Vol. 46. P. 1097—1108.

22.  Roy M. P., Steptoe A., Kirschbaum C. Life events and social support as modera­tors of individual differences in cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity // Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1998. Vol. 75 (5). P. 1273—1281.

23.  Sanders G. S. Social Psychology of Health and Illness. Routledge, 1989.

24.  Sarason B. R., Sarason I. G., Pierce G. R. Traditional views of social support and their impact on assessment // Social Support. N. Y., 1990. P. 9—25.


Back to the section