IKBFU's Vestnik

2020 Issue №02

Compounds in Fyodor Ivanov’s texts (based on «A letter…» and «A petition…» of 1666)

Abstract

This article draws a connection between compounds, on the one hand, and the general meaning of two documents from the manuscript legacy of an ideologist of the mid-17th-century Russian Orthodox schism and his worldview, on the other. The study aims to consider through the prism of dia­chronic linguistic personology the texts authored by the dyak Fedor Ivanov. The content of the article is a product of its methodology, namely, continuous sampling, using which 193 with several roots were obtained; context analysis; and interpretation. From the perspective of historical linguistics, preliminary results include establishing the meaning of three units that were absent in his­torical lexicography and revealing chronological usage of another word. From the perspective of diachronic personology, the main finding is the fragmentary reconstruction of Ivanov’s worldview, using linguistic devices and text refer­ences. It is concluded that the first roots of compounds partially reflect the se­mantic structure present in the two texts.

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The genitive of quality as used in typological characterisation of a person

Abstract

This paper describes the syntactic model termed as the adnominal genitive of quality, as well as its use in the archetypisation of a person. It is argued that the semantics of a noun functioning as an adnominal attribute produces two types of cultural-linguistic archetypes. An attribute noun referring to a sphere of moral or behavioural characteristics (‘человек сло­ва’, ‘man of success’, ‘człowiek honoru’) is associated with the model of the ethnocultural ar­chetype; a meaning relating to a period of life, locality or occupation (‘человек эпохи’, ‘дети улицы’, ‘люди моря’), with that of the cultural-linguistic sociotype.

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Frame approach to analysing the semantisation of the biblical quasi-anthroponym prodigal son in the language of Russian poetry

Abstract

This article describes ways to semanticise the biblical quasi-anthroponym ‘prodigal son’ in a poetic text, using the frame approach as a means of cognitive modelling and description. This approach helps to identify and characterise meaning construction mechanisms in a prec­edent onomastic sign, which conveys the conceptual meanings of the biblical text. The study proposes a new methodology for analysing the biblical anthroponym in a poetic text.
The results obtained suggest that the realisation of the quasi-anthroponym prodigal son in Russian poetry texts of different periods is associated with either inheriting or transform­ing conceptual basic biblical meanings. If the basic frame scenario is executed with high preci­sion, i.e. using a complete set of ideationally significant slots, the biblical quasi-anthroponym prodigal son determines how deeper meanings associated with the poetic interpretation of that eternal plot develop in the text. The inheritance of meanings is carried out both explicitly and implicitly, whereas the poetic interpretation of the biblical plot retains an essential con­nection with the basic protoframe. In most contexts, the meanings of the basic frame undergo a transformation when biblical symbolism is cancelled out, and the quasi-anthroponym ‘prod­igal son’ merely com­municates a generalised phraseological meaning.

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Specific ways to interpret the biblical expressions paradise and hell in the headings of aphoristic definitions

Abstract

This paper describes ways to interpret the lexemes paradise and hell in definition-like aphorisms resembling a dictionary entry. These definitions use both traditional universal ways to interprets words and specific ones, in particular, association, antonymy-based dis­tinction, repetition-based distinction, and formal signalling. When association is invoked, the lexemes paradise and hell are interpreted based on metaphorical convergence and met­onymic adjacency. Antonymy-based distinction means that the two lexemes are defined by each other, with their individual characteristics indicated later. Repetition-based distinc­tion relies on a figurative statement that repeatedly uses the same word followed by an ex­planation. Formal signalling defines the lexemes ‘paradise’ and ‘hell’ as elements of objec­tive reality rather than as biblical spatial objects.

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