IKBFU's Vestnik

2020 Issue №1

Kanishchev V. V., Baranova E. V., Zhukov D. S.

Abstract

The article presents the results of the quantification analysis of urban ri­ots (pogroms) of 1917—1918. The objects of the study are cities of the Russian Empire (Republic) located on the territory of modern Russia. The initial data was obtained through the content analysis of published and archival sources. The authors examined more than 600 events. The results of the study are the main quantitative parameters of the rebel movement: action forms, the composition of participants, requirements, etc. The largest number of events occurred in the Volga region (22 %), Petrograd (17 %), Moscow (13 %) and the Central Industrial District (12 %). The most active rebel groups were commoners (participated in 52 % of the events), soldiers (45 % of the events) and industrial workers (11 %). The most widespread form of ur­ban riots (pog­roms) was lynching and other forms of spontaneous violence against individ­uals (53 %). Rebels most often put forward the following de­mands: the distri­bution of bread (36 %), anarchist demands (27 %), dissatis­faction with indi­viduals (23 %), the struggle against tsarism (14 %) and the bourgeoisie (13 %).

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The later works of Boris Porshnev in foreign historiography

Abstract

The author analyses the reception of works and academic ideas of a re­nowned Soviet historian Boris Porshnev (1905—1972) in foreign historiog­raphy. The research shows that the historian failed to repeat the success of his monograph (1948) on popular uprisings in France before the Fronde, which was well received abroad and provoked long-standing dispute among the his­torians. Other works of Porshnev evoked a much more moderate reaction from foreign colleagues. The paper outlines the main objections expressed by for­eign researchers to the various academic ideas of Porshnev, and provides the reader with general assessment of Porshnev’s late works in the humanities.

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Thematic parallels in the hagiographies of Adalbert of Prague and old Russian narratives

Abstract

This article presents a comparative hagiographic analysis of the life and martyrdom of Adalbert of Prague, who was extremely popular in Central Europe X—XII centuries, and hagiographies and old Russian chronicles re­lated geographically to the events that took place in the basin of the Upper Oka. The author identified several direct and indirect parallels of the plot. Among them, there is a description of the activities of the Adalbert-Gaudentius brothers and the legendary Radim and Vyatko brothers. The story describing the tragic death of hieromonk Kuksha is similar to the ones describing the killing of Adalbert of Prague. This similarity can be explained both by the commonality of the plot and the storyline, and the writer’s acquaintance with the hagiographies.

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